Tamsin Jane Donaldson collection - NJSN_AC-031 1968 - 1983

By: Donaldson, Tamsin MsSeries: Series 1: Publications, 2968-1977; Series 2: PapersDescription: 0.18 linear metres Paper in manila folders 1 X T1 Box = (H)25cm x (W)18cm x (D)40cm Type 1 archive box (H)25cm x (W)18cm x (D)40cmSubject(s): Donaldson, Tamsin | Feminism | Canberra (A.C.T.) | Women in the work force - women and power - abortionProduction credits: PRODUCTION CREDITS NOTE: Library permission and acknowledgement required. Summary: BIOGRAPHY Tamsin Donaldson was born in London England in July 1939. She attended Bedales School, Hampshire as a scholarship student from 1951-1957. From 1957-58 she worked in Italy in a variety of jobs including teaching for Instituto Britannico. She read Italian and French at Somerville College, Oxford, where she gained a BA Second Class Honours in Italian and French with a distinction in colloquial French in 1961. Later in 1961 Donaldson worked as a teacher of English for Kemijoki Oy, a firm which built hydroelectric power stations in Finland and Lapland. She married in 1962 and is the mother of two children. Donaldson visited Australia in 1962 teaching English to Greek migrants on the voyage out. On her return to England she achieved her Diploma in Public and Social Administration. In 1965 Donaldson worked for the Oxford Committee for Racial Integration. Between 1965-67 Donaldson established and taught a non-English speaking class, composed of mainly illiterate Punjabi women and their children. This was financed by the Oxford College for Further Education. Between 1967 and 1969 Donaldson taught English as a second language in Oxford to secondary, primary and infants schools. She spent eight months in Australia learning about migrant education. In 1970 Donaldson became a research assistant at Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra. Between 1975-80, while working on her PhD,which she gained in 1977, she worked as a part-time lecturer for the Centre for Continuing Education, then as a part-time lecturer at the Department Of Linguistics, Faculty Of Arts, ANU and occasional lecturer in courses on Australian Linguistics. She worked as a temporary audiographer (linguistics) AIAS Tape Archives in 1979 before moving to Darwin where she worked as a temporary lecturer at Batchelor, Darwin Community College. She worked as a research consultant on a Commonwealth Dept of Education project on Aboriginal adult literacy. Donaldson became linguistics tutor for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students studying at ANU under the Aboriginal Study Grants Scheme in 1980. In 1981 she was involved with support work with the Ngiyampaa dictionary with suspensions to lecture at SAL and Sydney University. Through 1982-83 Donaldson was employed as temporary lecturer at the Department of Anthropology at the University of Sydney. In 1982 she was appointed Honorary Research Fellow in the Department Phonetics & Linguistics, University College, London and in 1983 visiting Fellow in the Department of Linguistics, Faculty of Arts, ANU. (See CV Box 0025 File 2)
List(s) this item appears in: Women's Electoral Lobby: Stage 6 History Women's Movements
Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Archives - Collection Archives - Collection
Tamsin Jane Donaldson Collection Compartment 1/Bay 1/Shelf 5/Position 4 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available for reference in the library

ARRANGEMENT OF CONTENTS:

Box 1:
Series 1 - File 1;
Series 2 - File 2-8.

BOX CONTENTS

SERIES 1: Publications.
This series consists mainly of feminist journals, pamphlets, booklets, reports, addresses, and proposals for legislation. Most of them have been added to the Jessie Street National Women’s Library collection with the exception of two pamphlets marked with an asterisk listed below that do not fit into the library’s collection policy. They are held with the list of publications in File 1.
*History Workshop pamphlet Number 9, ‘Children’s Strikes in 1911’ by Dave Mason, Ruskin College, Oxford undated.
*’Aboriginal History’ Vol 6 1-2 1982 by Eliza Kennedy and Tamsin Donaldson Box 0025 File 1. Duplicate copies have been discarded.
Journals
‘Newsweek’ “Angela Davis Black Revolution” October 26, 1970;
‘Mejane’ Newspaper:
No.1, March 1971;
No 2, May 1971;
‘Out From Under’:
Possibly January 1973;
‘Out From Under A Journal Of Women And Power’;
‘Canberra Polemics’, April 1976;
‘Refactory Girl A Women’s Studies Journal’:
Number 3, winter 1973;
Number 4, spring 1973;
Number 6, June 1974;
‘Mabel Feminist Newspaper’:
No.1, December 1975;
‘People’:
Volume 3, number 1, 1976;
Volume 4, number 3, 1977;
‘Women in the workforce series’:
Commonwealth Of Australia, Dept of Labour And National Service;
‘Night Work Restrictions’, June 1968;
‘Married Women in Industry: Three Surveys’, July 1968;
No. 5 ‘Children Of Working Mothers’, October 1968;
No. 6 ‘Facts and Figures’, December 1968;
No 7. ‘Child Care Centres’, January 1970;
No 8. ‘Some Aspects of Part-Time Work’, September 1970;
No 9 ‘Changing Horizons’, October 1970;
‘History Workshop Pamphlets’ 1973 Series:
No 11. ‘Country Girls in 19th Century England’ Jennie Kitteringham;
No 12. ‘Big Mother And Little Mother In Matabeleland’ Edgar Moyo.
Reports and papers:
‘Women’s Liberation Revolution’: a paper prepared by six members of the Women’s Liberation movement in the USA for the new university conference in June 1969;
‘Immigration and the Balance of the Sexes in Australia’: A report to the Minister of State Immigration by the Immigration Advisory Council, Sept 1969;
‘The Woman’s Role in Immigration’, Immigration Reference Paper, An Address To The National Immigration Committee Of The YWCA by The Hon Phillip Lynch MP, May 1973.
‘Equal Opportunities For Men & Women’, Government proposals for legislation Department of Employment Department of Education and Science Home Office, September 1973.
Booklets
‘Women Workers Struggle For Their Rights’, Alexandra Kollontai translated from Russian by Celia Britton, (Falling Wall Press 1973.)
‘The Political Economy Of Women’s Liberation’, Margaret Benson (unsourced and undated.)
‘Monster’, Poems of Robin Morgan (unsourced and undated.)
File 1: List of publications, 1968-1977.
SERIES 2: Papers.
This series consists mainly of newsletters, papers, pamphlets, press clippings handouts and some publications. Most of the press clippings have been photocopied and originals have been stored in Box 0002 LAP for preservation. The material in this series reflects Donaldson’s interests in women’s issues. It relates to organisations that apparently Donaldson was involved with, such as Women’s Electoral Lobby, (WEL) Abortion Law Reform, (ALRA), Women’s Liberation, (WL), Canberra Women’s Liberation (Canberra WL) and The Association for the Study of Women in Society. The series also includes two of Donaldson’s Cvs.

File 2: "A" Papers, 1973-1983.
File 3: "B" Papers, 1971-1974.
File 4: "C" Papers, 1958-1979.
File 5: "D" Papers, 1970-1976.
File 6: "E" Papers, 1971-1976.
File 7: "F" Papers, 1966-1977.
File 8: "G" Papers Abortion, 1971-1973.

RESTRICTIONS ON PUBLICATION:

Reproduction rights are owned by Jessie Street National Women's Library. Material may be saved or printed for private research, however, if it is to be used for any other purpose, a ‘Request Permission to Publish’ form should be completed.

RESTRICTIONS ON PHYSICAL ACCESS:
Available for research. Not for loan.

PRODUCTION CREDITS NOTE: Library permission and acknowledgement required.

When this collection was received by the Library, Tamsin Donaldson’s papers were contained in two type 1 archive boxes, numbered 28 and 29. Publications within the Library’s collection policy have been listed and added to the Library’s own collection. Publications not within the collection policy remain with the papers. Duplicates have been discarded. The box containing the collection has been renumbered 0025.

BIOGRAPHY

Tamsin Donaldson was born in London England in July 1939. She attended Bedales School, Hampshire as a scholarship student from 1951-1957. From 1957-58 she worked in Italy in a variety of jobs including teaching for Instituto Britannico. She read Italian and French at Somerville College, Oxford, where she gained a BA Second Class Honours in Italian and French with a distinction in colloquial French in 1961. Later in 1961 Donaldson worked as a teacher of English for Kemijoki Oy, a firm which built hydroelectric power stations in Finland and Lapland. She married in 1962 and is the mother of two children.
Donaldson visited Australia in 1962 teaching English to Greek migrants on the voyage out. On her return to England she achieved her Diploma in Public and Social Administration. In 1965 Donaldson worked for the Oxford Committee for Racial Integration. Between 1965-67 Donaldson established and taught a non-English speaking class, composed of mainly illiterate Punjabi women and their children. This was financed by the Oxford College for Further Education. Between 1967 and 1969 Donaldson taught English as a second language in Oxford to secondary, primary and infants schools. She spent eight months in Australia learning about migrant education.

In 1970 Donaldson became a research assistant at Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra. Between 1975-80, while working on her PhD,which she gained in 1977, she worked as a part-time lecturer for the Centre for Continuing Education, then as a part-time lecturer at the Department Of Linguistics, Faculty Of Arts, ANU and occasional lecturer in courses on Australian Linguistics. She worked as a temporary audiographer (linguistics) AIAS Tape Archives in 1979 before moving to Darwin where she worked as a temporary lecturer at Batchelor, Darwin Community College. She worked as a research consultant on a Commonwealth Dept of Education project on Aboriginal adult literacy. Donaldson became linguistics tutor for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students studying at ANU under the Aboriginal Study Grants Scheme in 1980.

In 1981 she was involved with support work with the Ngiyampaa dictionary with suspensions to lecture at SAL and Sydney University. Through 1982-83 Donaldson was employed as temporary lecturer at the Department of Anthropology at the University of Sydney. In 1982 she was appointed Honorary Research Fellow in the Department Phonetics & Linguistics, University College, London and in 1983 visiting Fellow in the Department of Linguistics, Faculty of Arts, ANU. (See CV Box 0025 File 2)

RESTRICTIONS ON REPRODUCTION

Library permission and acknowledgement is required to copy material for research purposes.

Part of the Canberra Women's Archive which Mary Hutchison and Frances Sutherland donated to Jessie Street National Women’s Library. Deed of Gift. 1993 A1999/3 1 standard archive box.

Copyright holder is JSNWL.

English

OWNERSHIP & CUSTODIAL HISTORY
Preparer’s notes:
Tamsin Donaldson’s papers were once part of the Women’s Archive, a collection started early in 1982 by a small group of Women’s Studies students at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra. The Archive was supported by ANU although it received no funding from them. The “Canberra Women’s Archive” as Women’s Archive became known, consists of the personal records of some prominent Canberra women activists, and the papers of community women’s organisations which were established in the ACT during the 1970s and 1980s. The collection documents the history of the second wave feminism movement in community women’s groups in Canberra. In 1993 it became impossible for the Women’s Archive to continue its operations due to lack of funds. Mary Hutchison and Frances Sutherland donated the material to Jessie Street National Women’s Library (JSNWL). Because it is unique, conditions of the donation to JSNWL were that the collection was to be kept together and not subsumed into a major collection. When JSNWL took custody of the Canberra Women’s Archive the collection was deposited at the Petersham Town Hall repository of the Marrickville Council for safe keeping until funding was arranged.

In 1995 an archival policy was implemented by JSNWL through a Special Research Project at the University of New South Wales coordinated by Dr. Peter Orlovich. Student archivist Martine Bright undertook to appraise the Canberra Women’s Archives. She compiled a report and submitted it in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of the Graduate Diploma in Information Management Archives/Records. In 1999 the Archives were brought to the library’s new home in Town Hall House, Sydney when the library received a state government grant through the Ministry for the Arts. This enabled the library to employ two part time archivists to work on the collection.

Tamsin Donaldson’s papers were contained in two type 1 archive boxes that were numbered 28 and 29 when received by the Library. Box 28 contained numerous publications, (see list in file1 Box 0025) and Box 29 held one 30 x 41 cm brown envelope and six buff coloured manila folders, which were identified by letters A to G. An inventory of the contents of folders A to E was attached to the front. There is an inventory with each file, which was prepared by the Canberra Women’s Archive sometime before the papers were donated. The file, envelope titles, and arrangement within them have been preserved in original order. The papers were removed from the original folders, and were replaced with new ones. The box was renumbered 0025. Publications not held by the library which fit with the collection policy of the Library have been listed and added to the Library’s own collection. Publications, which do not fit within the collection policy of the JSNWL, remain with the papers. Duplicates have been discarded.

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